Self Assessment

Blog Self- Assessment

I believe my blog posts are rich in content provide insight from the point of view of an instructional designer looking at concurrent enrollment for high school and community college. I did provide clear connections to real life situations in depth and detail.

I used and cited the readings from the course and other articles, books and blogs to support my comments. I used APA style to list all my references at the end of each blog post. Additionally I chose two of the resources each week to add to the class Diigo site.

All required posts were made but most were posted on the last day. It did give other learners time to respond but posting them earlier each week would have allowed more time for discussion.

I made two substantial posts each week to other learners’ blog posts. I offered suggestions, made connections with my work and my experiences and links to useful resources.

Self- Assessment Scoring

Content – 70/70
Reading and Resources – 20/20
Timeliness – 15/20
Responses to Other Students – 30/30
Total – 135/140

Course Reflection

EDTECH 541 Course Reflection

In my work as an instructional designer and an outcome mentor for my college’s information and technology literacy student learning outcome, I regularly use and help instructor integrate technology into their curriculum. Despite that this course took me out of my usual duties and had me looking into two areas where technology is really new for me. These area are assistive technology and technology for English language learners. At my college there is another instructional designer and a whole Special Services department that handles request and looks at ADA compliance. I regularly hear from my colleagues about different technology and UDL but this was the first time I really delve into the readings, the different blog sites and looked at the technologies. Playing with the different technologies I really saw how the different products like speech to text could help all the students in the class and not just the students who needed services. When I looked at the tools for cognitive disabilities I see how they could be adopted in many of our introductory course where college is new for students. I think this course has me grow professionally in that I will start looking for new information and readings in assistive technology and see how I could use technologies for all students. So I see this as the greatest impact of the course. Of course, I love how I developed most of a Principles of Marketing course that has technology fully integrated and also justified through the relevant advantage framework from Roblyer (2016).  I also constantly kept looking back fo the National Educational Technology Plan and how make sure students were creators with technology rather than passive consumers of technology. When I look at what theory guided me through this course it was Connectivism (2005). I was always looking at where the knowledge was residing, the currency of the knowledge and how to connect students with a larger network.

References

2016 National Educational Technology Plan (2016). Office of Educational Technology.

Roblyer, M.D. (2016). Integrating Educational Technology Into Technology (7th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson

Siemens, G. (2005). Connectivism: A learning theory for the digital age. International

Journal of Instructional Technology & Distance Learning, 2 (1). Retrieved from

http://itdl.org/Journal/Jan_05/article01.htm

 

 

Rationale for Assistive/Adaptive Technology

Schools, universities, and libraries are struggling with tight budgets. How can we justify spending a lot of money to buy assistive technologies that might only be used by a small number of people?

One of my friends who is our LMS coordinator is disabled. She has always been a huge proponent for ADA compliance and throughout she has never made it about serving a small population instead she always advocating on how it can serve the larger student population. When I started to do research on the rationale for assistive and adaptive technology I immediately found literature on what she tells everyone. From the Council for Exceptional Children, the first recommendation is “Emphasize the importance of supporting and utilizing technologies that have a strong evidence base for a broad range of learners including students with disabilities”(n.d.).

As an instructional designer I have often heard assistive and adaptive technology aligned with Universal Design for Learning. I have found that many of the services provided by our Disability Support Services at my college actually benefit more than the student that identified as disabled. An example would be when Disability Services does close captioning for videos. In online learning we have found that once other students find out that close captioning is available, it is used by students who do not have hearing impairments. We have also received requests from ELL for transcipts not because of a learning disability but because sometimes the instructor will talk too fast for them to easily comprehend. Though not yet required by our college’s ADA compliance when designing a new course we try to encourage all instructors to create a transcript with their videos.

Universal Design provides flexibility in how information is presented and also how students are able to respond and demonstrate their knowledge (Alndhdi, 2014, p. 19). My rationale for using assistive technology is that is good instructional design and reaches student in multiple modalities. It is not limited to a small group of students instead all students could benefit from technology tools and design that reduces barriers in teaching and learning.

References

Alnahdi, G. (2014) Assistive technology in special education and the universal design for learning. The Turkish Online Journal of Educational Technology. 13 (2) Retrieved from http://www.tojet.net/articles/v13i2/1322.pdf

Council for Exceptional Children, (n.d.),  Embedding technology in education for all learners: CEC’s recommendations to the National Education Technology Plan. Retrieved from https://www.cec.sped.org/~/media/Files/Policy/Archives/Assistive%20Technology/CEC%20Recommendations%20to%20National%20Assistive%20Technology%20Plan.pdf

 

English Language Learning & Dodgeball

At my campus, co-ed intramural sports are popular and offered through Student Life. Basketball, baseball and soccer are part of these activities but there is one sport that is particularly foreign to our ELL students and that sport is dodgeball.

While Student Life has tried to explain the sport and even offer the movie Dodgeball as a movie night, Dodgeball has not been popular activity with our ELL students.

Student Life assumed by showing the video (using a technology medium to demonstrate the sport and culture) would be an effective way of establishing declarative knowledge with the ELL students. I have been asked by one of our ELL instructors to develop an activity that would help the ELL students understand the sport and promote it. As a marketing instructor, this sounds like a situation where a certain demographic is aware of the product but does not understand the product. You can take a look at the trailer to have some understanding on the complexity of the movie when it comes to American popular culture, parody, hyperbole and idiomatic expressions.

Edyburn in (Roblyer, 2016) suggests that multilingual processing may be an obstacle in the classroom and I would extend that to Student Life’s attempt to use technology in the form of the movie. ELL students may need more time to process, look up words or may even need to have something like an outline to help them understand not only the vocabulary but also the culture.

Based on this week’s resources, I found the English Learner Movie Guide. It does not cover a long list of movies but the format is useful. It has movie guide that pulls out American popular culture, idioms and slang.

Another resource that is useful is English Idioms & Idomatic Expressions. It is a dictionary of over 3,835 expressions.

To overcome one of the obstacles in content marketing, I’m developing a lesson plan that has the ELL students making a movie guide which will also include references for dodgeball. Our next campus dodgeball tournament is on April 26 so we might not be ready for that one, but we should have a guide for ELL student ready for Fall 2016.

Resources

ESLnotes.com (n.d.) The English Learner Movie Guide. Retrieved from http://www.eslnotes.com/

Roblyer, M.D. (2016). Integrating Educational Technology Into Technology (7th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.

UsingEnglish.com (n.d.) English Idioms & Idiomatic Expressions. Retrieved from http://www.usingenglish.com/reference/idioms/

Marketing, Technology and Ethics

An obstacle that educators may face when integrating technology to enhance marketing, public relations, social media and market research as a content area is to make sure the emphasis isn’t just using on the latest technology and social media but to use the technology in an ethical manner.

The advertising and marketing industry doesn’t always do the best job to  being ethical. See the video below. Advertising and marketing does has a history of selling products, choices and life styles that hurt and sometimes kill its consumers. This manipulation is discussed in Roblyer (2016, p. 341) in challenges in teaching social studies. Students need to know how to critically assess imagery and media and also how to ethically the media they create.

Now instead of pro-cigarette advertisements you’ll see #Catmageddon videos produced by The Truth part of the American Legacy Foundation.  This Washington D.C. based charity was created out of the Tobacco Industry’s lawsuit settlement with several states. Despite the cute video, this organization is not without controversy on how is now not naming the corporations that still produce and sell cigarettes.

There is another area that may happen even closer to home. We can now use technology to reach more people through online surveys like SurveyMonkey and Qualtrics. We can also easily go online to do interviewing and focus groups through technology such as Skype or other video conferencing with platforms like GotoMeeting or WeVideo. We have to keep in mind to do this ethically.

The most frequent violation of ethics I see is representation of non-research activities as research. I regularly see and hear educational institutions and non-profits pitch recruitments and fundraising in the guise of conducting research. This is a violation of the transparency portion of the Marketing Research Association Code of Marketing Research Standards.

In graduate school, I was first introduced to these two industry terms, frugging and sugging. It is very easy for someone trying  to help out a charity organization or school to do this without thinking there is any ethical consideration. Frugging is when you get a call, survey or interview that claims to be for research but ends up being an approach to fund raise for an organization or a person. Sugging is the same situation where after asking you questions about a topic for “research purposes” then tries to sell you a similar product or service or continues the discussion to the point where you are asked if you want help switching to another product or service.

Has this every happened to you? When we’re teaching marketing and integrating technology, we need to teach more than digital citizenship. We need to teach them how to be ethical marketers and global citizens.

The Truth, (2016, February 10). #CATmageddon [Video file]. Retrieved from  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tLtschJxRy8

MRA Code Marketing Research Standards, (n.d.), Mareting Research Association,  Retrieved from http://www.marketingresearch.org/issues-policies/mra-code-marketing-research-standards

Roblyer, M.D. (2016). Integrating Educational Technology Into Technology (7th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.